Salient White Elephant

April 25, 2009

Sustainable Skyscraper

A very tall building reserves some floors for producing energy. I guess you’d have to produce a heck of a lot of energy to generate as much revenue as you could get by leasing the space instead. I haven’t crunched any numbers or anything, but since the wind might be very strong at these altitudes, I’m guessing maybe it would work. Remember that the turbines would produce power 24 hours a day, and seven days a week. The office space would only be used for a fraction of that time:

Sustainable Skyscraper, Side View

Sustainable Skyscraper, Aerial View

Even more energy can be concentrated at the turbine if some of the wind from the non-turbine floors could also be collected. This might not be as difficult as it sounds:

Aerial View of Floor Used For Office Space Showing Flow Concentrating Windows, Sustainable Skyscraper

High pressure develops on the upwind side of the building in the cavity formed by the flow concentrating windows. Much of the air will simply escape around the outside edges of these upwind windows, but a lot of it will escape by flowing in the vertical directions (both up and down). Once this air escapes by moving either up or down, it will find itself at the entrance of the flow concentrating panels on one of the power producing floors. It thus augments the flow through the pie slice shaped flow concentrator. The same thing happens (but with opposite polarity) on the downwind side of the building. Note that these outside windows may span several floors of office space. In this case, we don’t have several levels of windows. Instead, just one tall window spans however many office floors are between the power producing floors.

It also might not be that difficult to think of ways to make sure no accidents happen. For example, the windows that can swing open are certainly designed so that there’s no way the wind could ever be strong enough to tear them from the building. But just to make sure, a cable could attach to the middle of the top and bottom of each window. The other end of the cable would be right above or below on one of the power generating floors, and it could attach either to the floor or the ceiling as the case may be. An alarm is activated if ever the window detaches from the building. Now there are 4 mechanisms that simultaneously guarantee the safety of the public:

  1. the windows are designed to be strong enough to withstand any weather conditions,
  2. the bottom of the window is tethered to the building in case the design proves to be flawed and the window tears away anyway,
  3. the top of the window is also tethered,
  4. an alarm notifies the authorities if ever a window becomes detached from the building (leaving it hanging from the 2 tethering cables). If the alarm is ever triggered, the streets below may be quickly evacuated.

Narrow Flow Concentrating Channels Variation

Here’s a variation that looks like it might make better use of real estate. (A mathematical analysis should be developed to verify whether this is indeed the case.) It is difficult for me to draw this variation, so let me first present a crude drawing that has some structures omitted, then I’ll explain how it works:

Aerial View, Sustainable Skyscraper with Narrow Flow Concentrating Channels

The panel in the center of the building yaws so as to separate the upwind flow concentrating channels from the downwind channels. The height of this panel is equal to the height of the building. High pressure air in the upwind channels is forced up to the roof of the building. This air is now drawn down from the roof of the building through the low pressure downwind channels. The turbine rotor and generator are on the roof. One side of the turbine rotor faces the high pressure air and the other side faces the low pressure air. In this way, a single turbine rotor and generator converts the wind to electricity. Alternatively, several (2 or 3) rotors are positioned (say) 10 stories apart, so that each turbine converts 10 stories worth of wind energy to electricity.

Advertisements

Leave a Comment »

No comments yet.

RSS feed for comments on this post. TrackBack URI

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Blog at WordPress.com.

%d bloggers like this: