Salient White Elephant

April 21, 2009

VAWT Wall

A great number of very tall and very slender VAWT rotors are arranged into a circular wall. All rotors are mechanically linked to a common drive mechanism (chain and sprocket?) so that all drive a single generator:

Savonius Wall

Alternatively, the wall is separated into (say) 30 degree arc segments. All of the rotors that are contained in a given 30 degree arc are mechanically linked to drive a single generator, but each arc drives a separate generator. This way the arcs that are largely parallel to wind velocity will not drag down the arcs that are largely orthogonal to wind velocity. (And those arcs that are largely parallel to wind velocity may still produce a small amount of power.)

Of course, the same idea may be applied to any type of tall slender vertical axis wind turbine.

Suppose 2 bladed H rotors or 2 bladed Darrieus rotors are used. In this case the rotational angle of each rotor may be phase shifted somewhat with respect to its neighbors, and the power output of the machine will be very smooth.

Of course, it isn’t necessary for the wall to be circular in shape. I’m guessing that a circular wall would produce the most energy and the highest capacity factor at sites that have completely unpredictable wind directions. But if a site has a somewhat predictable wind direction, then the wall can definately be shaped to take advantage of the prevailing wind direction. Also, the wall may assume a non-circular shape in order to make its way around some obstruction like a barn or something like that.

Note also that the smaller the rotor diameter, the higher the rotor rpm! This characteristic might allow for eliminating the gearbox (or at least for reducing the speed change required, and thereby increasing the efficiency of mechanical power transmission.)

Seems like this machine may turn out to be suitable for almost any application you can think of – from small to gigantic utility scale wind turbines! Imagine a wall of these rotors on top of a Walmart. The rotors could be small diameter, fairly tall, and made of plastic. Even if a rotor flies apart it shouldn’t create a hazard since its only light weight plastic. And it certainly seems like this idea would be just absolutely perfect for low cost, clean energy in the third world! Imagine a machine like this driving the low-tech water transport pump I posted earlier:

Dirt Cheap Ultra-Simple Efficient Third World Water Transport Pump

Muti-Speed Transmission

Yawing VAWT Wall

This machine doesn’t need a yaw drive, as its yaw angle is self regulating:

Downwind Yawing Savonius Wall

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